Opposition To Immigrant Sanctuary Spreads In CA

The opposition to state law providing sanctuary for illegal immigrants seems to be spreading across California.  Political experts say more local governments are resisting the state's effort to go against the Trump administration immigration crackdown.  In March, the federal Justice Department sued California over the California Values Act, sometimes called the "sanctuary state" law, which limits local police cooperation with federal immigration agents.  Since that lawsuit was filed, at least a dozen local governments have voted to join or support the federal government opposition to California's position.

The Board of Supervisors in Orange County, which has over three million people, is among the effort, and on Tuesday afternoon the San Diego County supervisors voted, 3-1, in favor of the Trump administration lawsuit.  Board Chair Kristin Gaspar says they expect the Trump administration to prevail in the lawsuit and will join in when California appeals. The City of Los Alamitos is also in the process of giving final approval to opt out of state's sanctuary law.  The City Council voted four-to-one on Monday night, citing that theirs is a charter city, which gives them more room to establish its own ordinances.

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California Attorney general Xavier Becerra says the California Values Act is good for the state.  He also says that the issue will be resolved in court.  The so-called sanctuary state law limits cooperation of local law enforcement with federal immigration authorities in the holding and deportation of illegal immigrants.

Governor Jerry Brown on Tuesday said he is "pretty close" to an agreement with the Trump administration on sending National Guard troops to the Mexican border. Brown says troops were "chomping at the bit ready to go" to help combat drug and gun smuggling and human trafficking. His comments came a day after federal officials said California rejected some proposed immigration related duties for the Guard.

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